Did ISLAM destroy the MONGOLS? – Rise of Muslims Episode 4

Did ISLAM destroy the MONGOLS? – Rise of Muslims Episode 4 – KJ Vids In the fourth episode of this videos series on the book titled “Muslims” by Ali Mahmood, the author talks about the Mongol Empire, Timur and the The Delhi Sultanate In the twelfth century the two great empires of the time were the Muslims in the Middle East and the Chinese in the Far East. Between these two great empires lay a

vast land, by-passed by history, whose inhabitants were the nomad Mongols who lived as they had always lived on horseback, in tribes without cities, without houses, without books. It was here that Temujin was born who would later be known as Genghis Khan, the World Conqueror. His father died and he was raised by his mother. Survival was not easy, and adversity

turned the helpless and illiterate child into a warrior who created the greatest empire in history, a lawmaker whose Yasa gave his people a code that endured long after his death, and a leader whose wisdom and discipline inspired and transformed his followers. He imposed a system based on merit. Young Temujin was captured and locked into a big wooden

collar called a kang. He escaped but knowing it was futile to flee with no horse, no food and a kang around his neck, he appealed to the family that had been his recent jailor who hid him. Temujin had a magical ability to persuade and seduce. He was saved and many years later he rewarded his saviours with the privileges of not paying taxes and sharing the

emperor’s cup. All those who helped Genghis were rewarded, all who resisted him were destroyed. The most important of the early followers of Genghis were two brothers, Jelme who once saved his life by sucking out the poison from an arrow that wounded the neck of the Khan, and Subotai

who went on to become the greatest general in history. Subotai conquered thirty-two nations and won sixty-five pitched battles. His achievements surpassed Alexander as he conquered Korea, China, Persia, Hungary and Russia. Europe was only saved by the death of Genghis Khan which required all Mongols to return to Mongolia to elect his successor. Subotai was a master of deception and surprise and possessed the soul of a gambler, which Napoleon considered the most important trait of a great general.

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Updated: 3 months ago — 3 months ago

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